Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a unique place in our nation as Australia’s first peoples and as custodians of the oldest continuing cultures in the world.

Australia’s Constitution needs to change to recognise the history, language and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and reflect our nation’s fundamental belief in the importance of equality and non-discrimination.

Labor wants meaningful and substantive change, change that unites the nation and reflects the hopes and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Labor is working to build public support for constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

On June 30 the Referendum Council delivered its final report to the Opposition Leader and Prime Minister.

Labor is very clear on its support for Aboriginal people in our Constitution, we support a declaration by all parliaments, we support a truth-telling commission.  

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten wrote to Prime Minister Turnbull proposing the establishment of Joint Select Committee -a bipartisan, parliamentary process- for working through the necessary detail for constitutional reform, so that a question can be finalised and that the other proposals that came from Uluru, a Makarrata Commission and a truth telling process, can be clarified and advanced.